Contact Us For Help

Browse Alcohol Detox an Addiction Rehab by State:

Alcoholism Treatment

There are typically three steps that are included in alcoholism treatment after the diagnosis of the disorder has taken place: intervention, detoxification, and rehabilitation. Because many alcoholics do not realize that their drinking is out of control, intervention is often necessary. Once upon a time, treatment providers felt that confronting the alcoholic about their drinking problem was the best way of handling the situation; however, per research, empathy and compassion are more effective strategies.

The best approach is to assist individuals in realizing the adverse impact alcohol abuse is placing on their life, and on the lives of those close to them. They can strive for alcoholism treatment, which teaches them how to lead a more healthful and sober life. If family members and employers are honest and genuine in their concerns, the alcoholic is more inclined to seek and receive treatment for their drinking problem.

Alcohol withdrawal is typically done in a controlled, supervised atmosphere, where medications is used to alleviate the painful withdrawal symptoms. In general, alcohol detoxification takes 4 to 7 days. In addition, an examination for other medical issue is imperative. For example, liver and blood clotting problems are frequent, so the alcoholic should be checked for these ailments as well.

Alcoholism treatment also teaches the individual the importance of eating a balanced diet with vitamin supplements. After detoxification, alcohol rehabilitation programs can help the recovering alcoholic to refrain from using alcohol in the future. These programs tend to provide counseling, psychological support, nursing, and other types of medical care. Therapy includes educating the alcoholic about their disease and its effects.

A lot of the staff members at rehabilitation centers are recovering alcoholics themselves; they can be great role models for the recovering alcoholic as a result. During the treatment process, the alcoholic can undergo inpatient care, where he resides in the facility temporarily. Or he can undergo outpatient alcoholism treatment, where he attends the program while residing at home.

To prevent the recovering alcoholic from relapsing, medications can be prescribed. A new drug, Acamprosate, has been shown to reduce relapse rates in the alcohol dependent individual. There is also Disulfiram, but the drug provides extremely unpleasant side effects if the individual drinks even small doses of alcohol within 2 weeks after taking Disulfiram. Naltrexone lowers alcohol cravings and is taken in injection form.

These forms of alcoholism treatment must not be taken if one is pregnant or have specific medical conditions. For individuals who are battling alcoholism, support groups are available and can be an invaluable source. Alcoholics Anonymous is a self-help group with recovering alcoholics who provide emotional support, while helping the recovering addict to stay clean. They help the addict to see that he is not alone in his battle because they struggle with it everyday as well.

Recent Articles
A series of studies have been conducted on the health issues relating to the short-term and long-term use of alcohol among adults. Long-term use can result in liver damage, certain cancers, and brain shrinkage. The second main cause of dementia is alcohol use; alcohol use often causes one to age qui A high school student who is alcohol-dependent has a harder time remembering words and simple geometric designs after a 10-minute interval than a non-alcoholic youth. Teens suffering from alcohol problems in high school may also suffer long lasting consequences. Still, it is unclear that if an indiv It is common knowledge that underage drinking is illegal, but it is important to note that it also poses an elevated risk to the individual and to society. Automobile crashes are the main cause of death among youths 15 to 20 years old. The statistics for deadly crashes among alcohol-induced drivers High school alcohol problems can also result in depression and stress, and in unfortunate incidences can lead to suicide, which is the third main cause of death among individuals age 14 to 25. One study revealed that 37 percent of 8th grade females who drank heavily confirmed to attempting suicide.
Statistics reflect that one in five adult Americans grew in a household that included an alcoholic. As a result, these children face a bigger risk for developing emotional problems than children who do not have a parent who is an alcoholic. Alcoholism tends to run in families; children with alcoholi The child may perceive himself as the main reason his mother or father drinks, blaming himself for their issue. In addition, the child may fret consistently about the issue at home. He may worry that the alcoholic parent will get sick, and may also fear violence between his parents. Parents suffering from alcoholism may make the child feel as though there is an awful secret at home. The embarrassed child consequently does not invite friends over and fears asking anyone for assistance. Due to the child’s disappointment in his alcoholic parent, he may find it difficult to trust Regardless of how the child behaves, the alcoholic parent will suddenly switch from being loving to angry. A child needs to have a regular daily schedule; this is important to his well-being; but in the home of an alcoholic parent bedtimes and mealtimes are always changing. The child may develop an