Contact Us For Help

Browse by states:

Greenup kentucky Alcoholism

    Pathways Inc
  • 57 Dora Lane
  • Greenup,KY, 41144


Recent Articles
An alcoholic always has troubling accepting that he needs help for his problem, but he should know that the quicker he seeks alcohol rehabilitation is the better chances he will have at achieving a successful recovery. If he harbors concerns about talking about his drinking problems with his health When seeking alcohol rehabilitation, the health care provider will ask the alcoholic a series of questions relating to her alcohol use. This is to determine if he actually has a drinking problem or not. The alcoholic should try to respond to these questions as honestly and as completely as possible. When receiving alcohol rehabilitation, the kind of treatment the alcoholic receives depends on how serious her alcoholism is, and what resources the community has available. Generally, treatment involves detoxification (ridding the body of all the alcohol in the system); consuming medications prescr Several alcohol rehabilitation services provide marital counseling and family therapy, since the support of family members is imperative to the recovery process. Most alcoholism treatment programs also involve Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meetings so the alcoholic can bond with others like her while le
When alcohol enters the body, the liver breaks it down so it can be eradicated from your body. If you ingest more alcohol than the liver is capable of processing, an imbalance can occur, wounding the liver by disrupting its typical breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fats. This is why alcohol an The ingestion of alcohol has three types of liver disease that are related to it. Fatty liver happens in nearly all people who drink heavily. The condition will get better after an individual ceases drinking. Alcoholic hepatitis is when the liver becomes inflamed; up to 35 percent of heavy drinkers Another example of the close association of alcohol and liver disease is alcoholic cirrhosis, which is the most dangerous type of alcohol-related liver disease. Around 10 to 20 percent of heavy drinkers get cirrhosis of the liver, generally after 10 or more years of heavy drinking. The symptoms of c The progression often sees heavy drinkers going from the fatty liver stage to alcoholic hepatitis and gradually to alcoholic cirrhosis; however, this progression depends on the patient. The chance of getting cirrhosis of the liver is especially high for individuals who drink heavily and have an addi