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Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in New Mexico

The Office of National Drug Control Policy cites that in 2007, New Mexico had 485 drug arrests made by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). Cocaine is easily accessible for distribution throughout the state in gram to ounce quantities for local usage. Per local law enforcement authorities, cocaine and crack cocaine distribution and consumption steadily ranks as one of New Mexico's most serious drug problems.

The availability of heroin has consistently risen in New Mexico over the last 5 years. There is also a rise in kilogram seizures and a consistent decline in the price of heroin. In New Mexico, marijuana is the most easily accessible drug. Most of the marijuana located there is grown in Mexico.

Methamphetamine can be found in multi-kilogram quantities in New Mexico. Club Drugs such as MDMA, ketamine, LSD and GHB are all accessible throughout the state, especially in Albuquerque and Santa Fe. Raves are often conducted in the area, mostly in remote locations on U.S. Forest Service lands. Due to El Paso's close geographical location to Juarez, Mexico, many of these drugs are seen in New Mexico, with purchases being made over-the-counter from unethical pharmacists.

Per 2005-2006 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 132,000 New Mexico citizens, ages 12 or older, admitted to past month use of an illegal drug; 627,000 New Mexico citizens confirmed that infrequent marijuana use was a substantial risk. Per a 2005 survey of high school students in New Mexico, 26 percent confirmed using marijuana.

One-third of New Mexico students surveyed in 2005 admitted to either being offered, sold or given an illicit drug on their school grounds. Per the 2005-2006 NSDUH data, 20,000 New Mexico 12-17 year olds admitted to using an illegal drug in the past month.

In 2006, New Mexico had more than 3,000 marijuana plants that were seized and destroyed under the DEA's Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program. There were 34 drug courts in New Mexico that had been running for a minimum of two years as of April 2007; 4 were newly created; and 17 were being implemented.

In 2006, 24.2 percent of the defendants serving a Federal sentence were guilty of a drug offense; 60 percent of these cases were regarding marijuana. Drug trafficking and immigration cases are pressuring New Mexico's Federal judicial and corrections system. The U.S. District Court in New Mexico has the biggest caseload per judge in America; it is also the fourth busiest court in the nation.

The New Mexico Corrections Department (NMCD) had 5,906 male and 620 female prisoners on June 30, 2007, during which time there were 13,598 probationers/parolees. Further, on this date, New Mexico had 1,486 inmates that were guilty of drug possession or distribution violations as cited by the NMCD. In 2006, New Mexico had 10,397 treatment admissions for drugs or alcohol; in 2005, there were 7,830 treatment admissions.

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Alcohol suffocates nerves that control normal actions, including breathing. A lethal dose of alcohol will gradually cease these operations, hence alcohol poisoning. Frequently, an individual who drinks heavy quantities of alcohol vomits because alcohol is an irritant to the abdominal area. There is An individual's blood alcohol concentration can continue to elevate even while she is unconscious. Even after she ceases consuming alcohol, it is still in her stomach and intestine and still travels into the bloodstream and flows throughout the body. It is unwise to assume that an individual will be When an individual suffers from alcohol poisoning she may undergo mental confusion, stupor, coma, inability to be awakened, vomiting, seizures, reduced and labored breathing, irregular breathing, reduced body temperature (hypothermia), bluish skin tone, or paleness. It is important to know these signals. In addition, waiting for all the signs to appear can also be dangerous. If the individual has “passed out”, it is possible that she could die. If you suspect alcohol overdose in an individual, do not attempt to guess how drunk she is, instead call 911 for a