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Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in Ohio

Powder and crack cocaine are Ohio's main drug threats, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy. In all Ohio's Substance Abuse Monitoring (OSAM) Network areas, the availability of crack cocaine continues to be high. Powder cocaine typically sells for $110 per gram, $800-$1,400 per ounce, and $23,400 per kilogram. The general purity levels for powder cocaine are 63 percent, and 75 percent for crack.

In Ohio, the abuse and distribution of heroin is increasing. Mexican black tar heroin is abundant in Southern Ohio. Generally, heroin sells for $140-$250 per gram, $2,400-$7,000 per ounce and $68,000 per kilogram, with the typical purity level being 52 percent.

In Ohio, marijuana remains the most commonly abused and easily accessible illegal drug. An individual can buy marijuana either in the pound or multi-hundred pound quantity range. One can purchase the lower quality marijuana for $75-$125 per ounce and the high quality for up to $200-$400 per ounce.

In most parts of Ohio, there is a consistent decline in the availability and abuse of methamphetamine. Meth use is more frequently seen among whites between 20 and 30 years old, with the drug's purity levels ranging from 7.4 percent to 100 percent.

Club drugs use such as Ecstasy, GHB, ketamine and LSD has consistently risen in Ohio. These drugs are increasing in popularity among young adults and juveniles, particularly in urban areas of Ohio. In Ohio, OxyContin abuse and diversion represent a substantial threat to the state.

In 2006, Federal agencies seized 1,706.2 kilograms of marijuana in Ohio. Further, Ohio had 243 methamphetamine lab incidents, as cited by the DEA and state and local authorities. In 2006, under the DEA's Domestic Cannabis Eradication/Suppression Program an excess of 42,000 marijuana plants were seized and destroyed. The Ohio State Highway Patrol also apprehended illicit drugs worthy of more than $54.6 million in 2006; specifically, more than $24 million in marijuana and more than $28 million in cocaine.

Ohio had 63 drug courts that had been running for at least two years as of April 2007; 5 had recently been created; 7 were being implemented. In 2006, 40 percent of individuals serving a Federal sentence in Ohio had committed a drug violation; 36 percent of these cases involved powder cocaine. The Ohio prison population was 49,752.40 on January 14, 2007. Ohio had 91,969 violators under supervision by state or state-subsidized county programs as of October 1, 2007; 32,399 were under state supervised parole or probation.

In 2006, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction (ODRC) had 8,829 commitments for drug violations. Each month, ODRC performs random drug testing on 5 percent of the prisoners. In 2006, 1.5 percent of prisoners tested positive for drugs during these tests. ODRC said there were 14,585 inmates participating in alcohol and other drug (AOD) programs in 2007.

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