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Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in Pennsylvania

The Office of National Drug Control Policy states that in 2007, Pennsylvania law enforcement agencies cited 1,935 juvenile and 17,607 adult arrests for the sale or manufacture of illegal drug. In 2006, Pennsylvania had 2,190 juvenile arrests and 18,372 adult arrests for the same reasons. In 2007, Pennsylvania had 51 juvenile and 445 adult homicide arrests.

In Pennsylvania, powder and crack cocaine continue to be one of the most accessible, popular and abused drugs. In the Commonwealth, South American heroin continues to be commonly available, with distributors targeting new clients in smaller and rural areas. In the northeastern and southwestern sections Pennsylvania, high-purity heroin is easily accessible.

Marijuana is plenty in wholesale and retail quantities in Pennsylvania. The common availability of marijuana causes it to be easily accessed and used by individuals from many different ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds.

In Pennsylvania, methamphetamine and crystal meth trafficking and abuse continue to be a significant problem. Further, meth is available in various amounts in the state of Pennsylvania with consumption being more prevalent in the Philadelphia area.

MDMA is mainly seen at raves and nightclubs in the Pennsylvania metropolitan areas, such as Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. It continues to be accessible to and popular among teenagers and young adults on college campuses across Pennsylvania. Per investigations, the diversion of hydrocodone products, oxycodone products, fentanyl and pseudoephedrine remain an issue in Pennsylvania.

Per 2004-2005 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 823,000 Pennsylvania citizens, ages 12 or older, admitted to past month use of an illegal drug. In a 2005 survey, 44.8 percent of Pennsylvania high school seniors admitted to marijuana use at least once in their lifetimes. More 2005 survey statistics reflect that 20.1 percent of high school seniors in Pennsylvania admitted to being high or drunk at school on at least one occasion in the past year.

Pennsylvania had 18 drug courts that had been running for at least two years as of April 2007; 14 had recently been created; 5 were being implemented. In 2006, 33.7 percent of individuals serving a Federal sentence had committed a drug violation; 44 percent of these cases involved crack.

The Pennsylvania Department of Correction (DOC) had 46,028 prisoners as of December 31, 2007; 1,513 prisoners were in therapeutic communities, representing 3.3 percent of the entire DOC inmate population. Notably, 64 percent of all new prisoners sent to DOC are dependent on drugs or alcohol and needed some type of treatment. By yearend 2005, there were 16,250 DOC prisoners enrolled in drug or alcohol treatment.

The El Paso Intelligence Center cites that in Pennsylvania, meth labs affected 4 children in 2007. In 2006, Pennsylvania had 69,803 treatment admissions for drugs or alcohol; in 2005, there were 76,595 treatment admissions. Per 2004-2005 NSDUH statistics, 252,000 Pennsylvania citizens needed treatment but did not receive it for illegal drug use in the past year.

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