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Alcohol Rehab Programs and Centers in Tennessee

In Tennessee, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) cited 306 arrests for drug offenses 2007, per the Office of National Drug Control Policy. In 2008, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation on Tennessee's college campuses reported 526 drug offenses.

In Tennessee, cocaine is most frequently consumed in crack form. The price of cocaine has also increased in the state. The use of heroin continues to be consistent over the last 6 years and is typically limited to a small amount of long time users.

In Tennessee, the abuse and trafficking of marijuana is a grave issue, particularly in rural areas of Tennessee. Methamphetamine availability and demand is also increasing in Tennessee. The majority of the meth used in Tennessee is shipped from Mexico and along the Southwest Border states. Methamphetamine use and abuse is expected to rise in Tennessee as the substance becomes more popular than crack cocaine. The existence of clandestine meth labs has grown 20.5 percent from 2007-2008.

There is also a "club drug" problem in Tennessee, which keep growing. MDMA (ecstasy), LSD, and GHB are the most frequent drugs of abuse. They are often sold at raves and have been seen in Nashville and Knoxville.

In Tennessee, the diversion of pharmaceuticals is also a growing issue. The Tennessee Medical Board suggests that use of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, meperidine, and amphetamine are above average in Tennessee. Dilaudid and morphine are heavily abused substances as well.

The 2006-2007 data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) cites that 444,000 of Tennessee citizens, ages 12 or older, admitted to past month use of an illegal drug. A 2007 survey of Tennessee high school students reflects that 38 percent admitted to trying marijuana at least once in their lifespan; 15 percent of Tennessee 9th graders who participated in this survey admitted to inhalant use at least once in their lifetime. The 2006-2007 NSDUH data states that 10 percent of Tennessee 12-17 year olds confirmed using an illegal drug in the past month.

Tennessee had 25,067 full-time law enforcement personnel as of October 31, 2008; 15,529 were officers and 9,358 were civilians. Mexican traffickers and drug trafficking organizations still play a growing primary role in the importation and distribution of illegal drugs within Tennessee.

In 2008, the DEA and state and local authorities cited that Tennessee had 533 meth lab incidents. Tennessee had 27,325 imprisoned felons as of June 30, 2009. In May 2007, 16.1 percent of Tennessee prisoners were incarcerated for drug violations.

During 2007 to 2008, the Tennessee DOC cites that 112 prisoners finished their substance abuse programs. Further, Tennessee had 56,179 adult probationers and 10,496 adult parolees as of December 31, 2007.

In 2008, Tennessee had 9,806 treatment admissions for drugs or alcohol, a decline from 10,278 in 2007, and a decline from 11,187 in 2006.

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